LARP and Ministry (part 3)

So, now I’ve racked up two posts about playing a priest character in a LARP for over a decade, and how that affected my this-world ministerial and devotional practice.  The first post was about spiritual counseling, the second about exegesis.  This third, (probably) last but (I hope) not least post will be about creating and performing prayers and ritual.

One can gather from prior posts that I didn’t create this religion for the game, nor was I the first to craft rituals and devotional practices for it.  There was already an established outline for the standard religious service, with prayers and invocations for various occasions.  There was, as well, a funeral service and blessings for the dead (important indeed in a world where combat against monsters and dark forces was a common occurrence).  The writers introduced new rituals and prayers occasionally, on at least one occasion having me hurry about to collect certain items and set a specific stage without letting me know what it was for until just before the ritual was about to commence.

But I was also allowed a great deal of creativity.  In some cases, I was creating something that already “existed ” in the game, but had never come into play- there had never been an in-game wedding in our faith, and so it was my pleasure to write the outline for one.  For another example, the ecclesiastical letters that I mentioned in post 2 always contained an appropriate prayer or invocation written by or revealed to the founder of the faith.

On the other hand, I had established my character as having some interest in and skill at poetry.  I wrote a number of prayers completely, and adapted several others (from sources including St. Francis as well as Kipling).  I also brought a devotional dimension into the ritual of making someone aware of magic by adding a guided meditation that used an appropriate story from the founding of the religion.

The most obvious benefit to my this-world practice was in making my public performance more confident.  I’m an introvert with some social anxiety and shyness; having a “playground” in which to practice being a celebrant helped me when I was doing the real thing outside of the game.  And the creativity involved in crafting in-game ritual and writing in-game religious poetry also resonated with my general creative life; more concretely, the in-game prayers I was writing were generally rhymed and metered, which challenged me usefully (as readers of my poetry here may notice, I work in free verse most of the time).  And all of my creative work is dedicated to my Patroness first, though I think She’s amused and bemused by my LARP work…

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